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Updated: 11 hours 4 min ago

This Weekend, Investigate The 'Edges' Of Fred Moten's Musical Poetry

Sun, 04/26/2015 - 5:42am

In honor of National Poetry Month, our latest Weekend Read is Fred Moten's collection The Little Edges. Poet Douglas Kearney says Moten's power is in his attention to music, both in text and subject.

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A City Full Of Contradictions, And A Trilogy To Match In 'Nocturne'

Sun, 04/26/2015 - 5:03am

The second volume of Anne Opotowsky's lavish trilogy about the Kowloon Walled City is like the city itself — vibrant and contradictory, its skilled atmospherics sometimes marred by sloppy art.

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The World Music Education of Philip Glass

Sat, 04/25/2015 - 3:06pm

In his new memoir, Music Without Words, the composer explains how a chance meeting with Ravi Shankar sparked a fascination with the cultures of the world and their music.

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Imagining The Power Of Edouard Manet's 'Very Active Muse'

Sat, 04/25/2015 - 8:06am

Maureen Gibbon's new novel, Paris Red, delves into the life of Victorine Meurent, Manet's favorite model and the central figure in some of his most famous paintings.

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Tiny Pages Reveal Big, Rodent-Related Worries In 'Devotion'

Sat, 04/25/2015 - 5:03am

Don't be put off by the size of Devotion: A Rat Story by Maile Meloy. It's a small book, hardly larger than a pack of cigarettes, but the horror it delivers is real (and rat shaped).

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It's The Fuzz! Cat Detective Swipes A Claw At Crime In 'William'

Sat, 04/25/2015 - 3:27am

When the Mona Cheesa goes missing in Paris, "international cat of mystery" William is called in on the case. Helen Hancocks joins NPR's Scott Simon to talk about William & the Missing Masterpiece.

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Don't Take His Stapler: 'Paper Clip' Author's Passion For Office Supplies

Fri, 04/24/2015 - 2:22pm

James Ward's new book stems from a lifelong love of Post-it notes, pencils and paper clips. He tells NPR's Melissa Block that they remind him of his school days, when life was less complicated.

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NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Fiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Fri, 04/24/2015 - 2:03pm

Richard Flanagan's The Narrow Road to the Deep North follows a doctor who is captured by the Japanese during World War II and ends up caring for prisoners of war. It appears at No. 9.

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NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Fiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Fri, 04/24/2015 - 2:03pm

Alexander McCall Smith's Emma is a retelling of Jane Austen's classic set in the 20th century. It debuts at No. 15.

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NPR Bestsellers: Week Of April 23, 2015

Fri, 04/24/2015 - 2:03pm

The lists are compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

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NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Fri, 04/24/2015 - 2:00pm

The Opposite of Loneliness is a posthumous collection of essays and stories by Marina Keegan, a talented Yale graduate who died days after graduation. It appears at No. 11.

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NPR Bestsellers: Hardcover Nonfiction, Week Of April 23, 2015

Fri, 04/24/2015 - 2:00pm

In The Road to Character, David Brooks looks at how some of the world's great thinkers have built strong inner character. It debuts at No. 1.

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'Pope And Mussolini' Tells The 'Secret History' Of Fascism And The Church

Fri, 04/24/2015 - 11:58am

Historian David Kertzer says the Catholic Church lent organizational strength and moral legitimacy to Mussolini's fascist regime. Kertzer recently won a Pulitzer Prize for his book.

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Lunch With Monet, Dinner With Jackson Pollock

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 10:55am

Two new books focus on the culinary lives of these two artists. Turns out, their approaches to food provide a new way of thinking about their two very different approaches to art.

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'Lovelace And Babbage' Is A Thrilling Adventure

Thu, 04/23/2015 - 5:03am

Sydney Padua's rollicking graphic novel about computing pioneers Charles Babbage and Ada Lovelace transforms punch cards and little brass cogs into the stuff of legend, says critic Etelka Lehoczky.

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Toni Morrison's New Novel Is Best Read With Her Backlist In Mind

Wed, 04/22/2015 - 5:03am

The Nobel Prize winner has become a giant in the literary world, but reviewer Saeed Jones says that her latest novel can only stand with confidence when it has the idea of the author as its spine.

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'Vermilion' Finds New Magic In The Old West

Wed, 04/22/2015 - 5:03am

Molly Tanzer's grit-and-ghosts adventure follows a young woman tasked with guiding troubled spirits in a colorfully diverse, alternate-history Wild West, full of talking animals and vampires.

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Bradley's 'China Mirage' Portrays A Long-Running U.S. Mistake In Asia

Wed, 04/22/2015 - 3:01am

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep talks to author and historian James Bradley, about his his new book, The China Mirage: The Hidden History of the American Disaster in Asia.

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After 20 Years On The Job, NYC Police Officer Tells His Intense Stories

Tue, 04/21/2015 - 1:25pm

"Your heart is pounding; your adrenaline is shooting out of your ears," Steve Osborne says. "And you got one second to get it right." He retired from the force in 2003. His memoir is called The Job.

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Revisiting A Suburbia-Gone-Sour In Ross Macdonald's Crime Fiction

Tue, 04/21/2015 - 1:11pm

A reissue of four of the detective writer's 1950s novels excavates the dark depths of California's suburban decay. Maureen Corrigan praises Macdonald's "psychological depth" and "penetrating vision."

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